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DIED SUDDENLY 
THIS MORNING 



Alice B. Walker, Ex- 
ecutive at Wayside 
Inn ; 111 Few Days 

Marlboro — Miss Alice Ball Walk- 
er, 1 Park street, assistant man- 
ager of the Wayside Inn, South 
Sudbury, and one of the best 
known young women of this city, 
passed away early this morning at 
the Massachusetts Osteopathic hos- 
pital, Jamaica Plain. Though she 
had not been in the best of health 
for the past two years she had at- 
tended to her duties at the Inn un- 
til the latter part of last week 
when she was taken suddenly ill. 
Monday afternoon she was remov- 
ed to the hospital where an oper- 
tion was performed in an effort 
to save her life. She failed to rally 
however, and gradually weakened, 
passing on at about 1 a. m. this 
morning. 

•Miss Walker was born in New 
Marlboro, Massachusetts, in 1888, 
the daughter of Mrs. Ida J. and 
the late John B. Walker. She was 
educated in the schools of Windsor 
iLocks, Connecticut, and Northfield 
iSeminary, and later attended 
iMorse Business College in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut. For a number of 
years she was bookkeeper for the 
'Rice & Hutchins Inc. in their Cur- 
tis factory, this city, and following 
the closing of the plant opened a 
tea room which she maintained 
for a time in the Major Rice block. 



iFor the past four or five years 
she has been employed in an exec- 
utive capacity at the Wayside Inn, 
where her exceptional business 
ability and conscientious service 
won the respect of her superiors 
as well as her assistants and her 
parsing will leave a vacancy very 
difficult to fill. News of her deata 
cast a shadqw of gloom over the 
entire surroundings. 

(Besides her mother, Mrs. Ida J 
Walker who lived with her in the 
home she purchased a few years 
ago, she leaves three sisters, Mr-. 
William J Bush of Los Angeled, 
California; Miss Clara B Walker 
of Fall River and Mrs. Alvin E. 
.Smith, of Hartford, Connecticut, 
also one nephew, Alvin Smith of 
Hartford. 

Funeral service will be held on 
iFriday afternoon at 1.30 at he.- 
home, 1 Park street, and will be 
private. Rev. Herbert M Oesner, 
minister of the Unitarian cnurch, 
at which Miss Walker was a mem- 
ber, will officiate. Interment will 
be in tne family iot in Oran;e, 
Massachusetts, in charge of Frank 
E Child, funeral director. 






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Unskilled Hands Learn Art of Spinning 




The Christian Science MoNiTOB-Widc World 



Mrs. Mary Maillet of Roslindale, Mass., Teaching Class 
I.pft to Right — Mrs. Frances Eisenberg, Employment Counselor; Miss Kathleen Fitzpalrick. Princi 
of Harlem Continuation School; Mrs. Mary Maillet, Teacher, and Miss Bertha Frey, Instructor for 

Homecraft League. 



pal 
the 



Mrs. Maillet Flew to New York 
To Teach Spinning to Women 

Perhaps Revival in Homespun Cloth Began When 

She, Who Clothed Her Children by Her Weaving 

Art, Said 'No, Please Do It This Way' 

\ 

Special from The Christian Science Monitor Bureau 



NEW YORK, Sept. 8— To some the 
story began when Mrs. Mary 
Maillet of Roslindale, Mass., dropped 
out of the skies in an airplane with 
her spinning wheel under her arm. 
To others it started when an ad^ 
vertisement appeared in New York 
and Boston papers asking for "old 
ladies who know how to spin." But, 
of course, properly the very begin- 
ning was when Mr. John Cole, ad- 
vertising man out of a job, said to 
Mr W. R. McHargue, another ad- 
vertising man out of a job, ''Say, 
here's a picture of Mrs. Roosevelt 
knitting in the Senate gallery. This 
is its a good time to revive home- 
spun." 

Mr. McHargue agreed and went up 
to the New York Historical Society 



to look at spinning wheels. He looked 
and he looked. In fact, a whole wing 
of the gallery was cleared one Satur- 
day afternoon, so he could definitely 
decide just what were the essentials 
of a spinning wheel. He tried all the 
society has. And then he went off 
and made one which is being dupli- 
cated in a factory and sold by 25 
leading department stores all over 
the country. 

Then the story took a new turn. 
It is all right, of course, to mar- 
ket spinning wheels and certainly 
it is true that the public just now 
is interested in all kinds of home- 
made products. But given an adver- 
tising man and a spinning wheel, 
and you are bound to have high 
spots in any story. 

Well, the high one in thus tale is 
Mrs. Maillefs. But before she 
started on that sky ride, she had 
read the advertisement in a Bos- 
ton paper which asked for an old 
lady who could spin. Mrs. Maillet is 
a pretty active person, but she didn't 
mind admitting she was a grand- 
mother. And she ought to know a 
lot about spinning. Wasn't she one 
of eight children who were entirely 
clad in homespun, and didn't she 
dress her own seven children in 
homespun, and even now doesn't 
she make mittens and caps for her 
erandchildren? 



Mrs Maillet didn't know why the 
advertisers wanted her photograph, 
but she was enterprising enough to 
have it taken right by the side of 
her spinning wheel, which was more 
than was done by any of the other 
49 ladies in Boston or the six in 
New York who replied. And so she 
got the job. 

The job really was to come to 
the Harlem Continuation School 
in New York, and under the De- 
partment of Adult Education of the 
State of New York to teach women 
to spin. Mrs. Maillet not only did 
that job well in the opinion of the 
educators, but she attracted a lot 
of attention, which was what the 
advertising men wanted. 

Now Mrs. Maillet is .back in Ros- 
lindale, but the two advertising men 
hope that in time they will be able 
to set her up as a teacher of spin- 
ning. It is reported that an appro- 
priation to teach spinning in the 
rural districts of New York State 
under the direction of the Depart- 
ment of Adult Education is not an 
impossibility. At the present time 
there is a Homecrafts League, 
which Miss Katherine Lee Grable 
is heading for the Adult Education 
Department and under whose aus- 
pices this teaching could be done. 

Already one leading New York 
store has agreed to buy homespun 
sweaters if the factory can supply 
them. Now, with the market waiting. 
£he promoters of the enterprise hope 
that women will undertake the 
spinning as a source of income. 

The movement bids fair to become 
national under the auspices of the 
annual exposition of Women's Arts 
and Industries in Astor Hotel from 
Sept. 25 to 30. Certainly there will be 
spinning ladies in the show, and the 
board of the exposition, headed by 
Mrs. Oliver Harriman, is looking into 
the possibilities of establishing an 
American Homespun League to in- 
terest women all over the United 
States in the possibilities of home- 
craft as a measure of family main- 
tenance and as an income-producing 
activity. 













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FOREIGN GAS 
GROUP HERE 

Will Visit Everett Plant 
as Guests of N. E. Asso. 



A group of 67 European gas expou- 
nd their Wives will be enter- 
tained today in Boston upon thel: ri 
turn from the annual convention of the 

hicago, 
and this morning will inspect the 
Everett plant of the Boston Consoli- 
pany. 

They will be transported across the 
harbor by boat, and busses will be 
used part of the way to the plant, 
where they will watch the workings of 
equipment which daily turn* out 70,000,- 
000 cti A shopping 

is planned for the women members of 
the i' i will also be entertained 

at lunch at the Ritz-Cariton Hotel by 
wives of New England gas executives. 
The men will h*' entertained at lunch 
at the Parker House by a large group 
of Xew England gas officials. 

The option of attending the Harvard- 
Bat^s game or of a sight-seeing tour 
in and about Boston, with tea at 5 
at the Wayside Inn in Sudbury, 
will be offered the. visitors. Announce- 
ment of the plans for the visit was 
made by H. R. Sterrelt, vice-president- 
general manager of the New Haven Gas 
Eight Company and president of the 
Xew England Gas Association. The 
partv will have its headquarters at the 
Hotel Statler. Vice-President w. C, 
Bee l<jord of the Boston Consolidated 
Gas Company has been appointed chair- 
man of the general committee of ar- 
rangements by Mr. Sterrett. The vis- 
iting gas executives represent England, 
Ireland, France and Switzerland. 




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r 

SAMUELS FEARS 
ECONOMIC RUIN 

Former Home Secretary of 

England Opens Ford Hall 

Forum Season 



&~UA^ii 



cxUcy 




Economic nationalism eventually will 
lead the world to disaster, Sir Herbert 
Samuels, M. P., former home secretary 
of England and former high commis- 
sioner of Palestine declared last night 
at an address that opened the .Ford 
hal) forum for this season. 

During the question period Sir Her- 
bert declined to answer a questi^jn asaj 
to whether England would suptwt 1 ' 
Fiance If the latter "moved on Qer- 
many," the inference being that reasons 
of state prevented him. 

Every seat ir the hall was occupied, 
several hundred were forced io stand 
when an "SRO" sign was placqF outside 
the hall 30 minutes before the forum 
began, and additional hundreds were 
turned away. 

Tariffs form one of the msfjoy,, ob- 
stacles to world recovery. Sir Herbert 
saJd. He described tariffs as Sjvalls 
which shut out foreigner* goods? but 
shut in your goods, too." He declared it 
a "mad policy ' to restrict production as 
is being done by the administration, and 
cited Secretary Wallace's words that 
"if tariffs stand there must be a drastic 
reduction In farm acreage.' 

England, France and the United 
States may be self-sufficient, but other 
nations are .not and to bar them from 
trading wlw* ■ halt the world would 
eventually lead to friction, war and 
imperialism,, he said. 

— — . -JXtc 



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DIRECTED BY ALBERT HAYNES OF 
SUDBURY 

October 10th to December 26th, 1933 

PLEASE PRESENT THIS TICKET AT THE DOOR 





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SALVATION ARMY BIDS 

COL JENKINS FAREWELL 

The last in the series of evangelical 
meetings held at the People's Palace, 
Washington and Brookline sts, took 
place last evening when a large gath- 
ering of Salvation Army members and 
friends bade farewell to Col Walter 
F. Jenkins of New York, who has 
preached at the meeting. 




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OL 





Maggie Murphy's Home 



By MICHAEL EARLS, S. J. 



v* 



If it is something to be great in literature, it is some- 
thing greater to be great in life : and therefore Maggie 
Murphy's Home— circa A. D. MDCCCLXXXVIII 
— is a greater thing, if not in material splendors, 
surely as an idea and a principle and a memory, than 
The Wayside Inn, though the latter stands a century 
older, still aglow with the fireside "Tales" written by 
Longfellow in his neighborly Cambridge study, and now 
firmly captured and delightfully captivated by the 
wealthy investment and efficient management of Mr. 
Henry Ford. 

And it is ardently hoped that some understanding and 
capable Maecenas of our day, such as Mr. Ford in regard 
of the Inn, will have the vision and the finance to pre- 
serve the Home from the slithering crashes of the 
encroaching city — from the rattling undermines of the 
Subway and the overhanging shadows of the Skyscrap- 
ers; and, as the Detroit patron, regardful of the Inn, 
preserved it upon its colonial foundations, but moved 
the Wayside away a hundred yards to secure the edifice 
against the road-shaking trucks and the jazzy disregard 
of the Profane Vulgars, so may some other Captain of 
Industry, with a Gaelic love of traditions, and an Ameri- 
can eye for the Public Thing, find a way to remove the 
brown blur and blatant bluster of the Elevated Railroad 
— the crued dragon that necessitated the closing of the 
front windows of the Home, and silenced the harmony 
of its tones in the parlor above the Avenue. 

Ah ! the dear parlor ! Bravo ! The gentle programs 
given by the melodeon, more charming than those of a 
modern radio, because there was no broadcasting of 
unbelievable wares through the comic rhetoric of tutored 
salesmen about Pilfer's Cigarettes or Makebelieve Pow- 
ders. How the poet of the Home was content to say of 
the function of that modest mahogany case and its 
pulsating reeds : 

There's an organ in the parlor, 
To give the house a tone! 

And how we would gather and pause for a few mo- 
ments out on the parterre of the social sidewalks, 

With all the boys and all the girls 
That worked down town with me, 

to hear the organ announce that the reception moment 
was ^ at the finger tips: and then would follow the suc- 
cession of melodies, repeated da capo al fin, about 
Sweet Marie, and the Two Little Girls in Blue, and The 
Sidewalks of New York, to assure the assembling pil- 
grims, whether youthful swains in the front hallway 
or the youthful-hearted parents on the back porch, that 

You are welcome every evening 
At Maggie Murphy's Home. 

Now, out front in the parlor, the young bloods would 
be laughing over their bantering dialogues and kindly 

jslogan: "Everybody welcome: everything tree." 



repartees, and bravely chanting the facile choruses of 
the latest songs ; and in the dim hallway at the head of 
the stairs there might be a cute chance for Ben Bolt to 
whisper to Sweet Alice. With what candor the poet 
of the Home admits and proclaims those interludes : 

And kisses on the sly. 

But it was in the rear rooms of the Home where the 
splendors gathered — the patient graces of life and the 
worthy material of literature. For thither assembled 
the elders of the parlor lads and lassies, "straggling 
along at any decent hour," to find a welcome and comfort 
in any corner of the kitchen and the dining-room. Here 
indeed was "an academy of courtesy and conversation,'.' 
(to quote a phrase from Alice Stopford Green's authori- 
tative paragraph about Miss Margaret's ancestors in the 
medieval times). What realms of literature these hum- 
ble men and women could travel over roads of poetry 
and prose. And this statement is not colored by any 
tint of exaggeration : for the assembled guests in the rear 
rooms of Maggie Murphy's Home were the intimate 
descendants of great traditions both of history and of 
legend. 

Externally they appeared to be, as indeed they were 
after the trying effects of famine and exile four 
decades before, the hewers of wood and the carriers of 
water : but their hearts were ever to be young and courag- 
eous in the vivifying effects of their glorious heritage, and 
their memories were unfailing manuscripts of recorded 
treasures, rehearsing not only the invigorating humor 
and wistful pathos of ballads in the ragged scholarship 
of the Hedge-School-masters, but also the epic splendors 
of the old sagas and the bardic cycles of romance as old, 
and yet as young, as Saint Patrick and Oisin. Every 
corner of the Murphy kitchen and dining-room con- 
tained a modest Seanichie whose ballads and stories 
were older than the narratives which were gathered for 
The Wayside Inn, — Paul Revere, King Robert of Sicily, 
Rabbi Ben Levi, and finally King Olaf's Saga, which 
Ole Bull, the musical Norwegian, is presumed to have 
recited : 

And then the blue-eyed Norseman told 
A Saga of the days of old. 
And in each pause the story made 
Upon his violin he played. 

And it is no scandal (such as modern scriveners affect 
to find for their biographical hish-hashers) to state here 
that Ole Bull had never been a guest at The Wayside 
Inn : and when that "historical fact" was enunciated by 
a ciceroness of the Inn to a group there with Mr. G. K. 
Chesterton recently, one could easily imagine that the 
distinguished Crusader, to whom the Longfellow "Tales" 
had been the golden A B C of his childhood in England, 
had ten thousand repartees ready to reply, as this, of a 
fragmentary dialogue, partly imaginary : 



(Follows a pause by the *, J*' „ fi> -]' ' , »>»■ * *j ■* 

ciceronesses display a Vermont sap bucket given by Mr. 

/ Calvin Coolidge and inscribed by Messrs. Ford, Fire- 

l,/ stone and Edison and by the Prince of Wales while a 

guest at Dearborn.) 

G. K. C. (splendidly) : And now let us sit here by 
the fire, and tell stories, stories older than Boccacio : 
they are better than the radio. (Happily and sensibly, 
the Inn has no radio.) 



N' 



"ow, returning to Maggie Murphy's Home, it is not 
necessary to asseverate that the ancient bards of 
Deirdre or of Oisin were never actually present with 
those who gathered about the parlor organ or the kitchen 
stove. No boast may be made, though it would be true 
that the skillful maker of Irish songs and novels, Samuel 
Lover, was a guest on Broadway, not far from the 
Home, in 1849, and that his grandchild, Victor Herbert, 
was growing to musical fame there in 1894. 

The point is that those evening groups who assembled 
about Mistress Murphy and Miss Margaret were lineal 
descendants and faithful retainers of a great tradition 
and of undimmed treasures in literature. Douglas Hyde, 
gathering material for books among the Galway hills 
in that decade, marvelled that he was able to take down 
from the lips of an old grandmother the thirty-four 
verses of a fourteenth century poem; this particular 
poem had been faithfully transmitted by memories all 
through those centuries, for only one manuscript copy 
of it existed, and that lay hidden and unknown in the 
Trinity College library. 

And from this instance, offered by a literary historian, 
we may easily realize what countless balads and stories 
were retained and repeated by the plain-clothed descend- 
ants of the seanichies and grandmothers from the clans 
in Munster and Connaught. Continental scholars, if 
they had visited Maggie Murphy's Home at that time, 
would have gladly given their contemporary testimony 
to the literary heritage displayed there, and would have 
solaced the hearts of the exiles with the courteous man- 
ner of their dialogue : 

Jules Jusserand (reading from the first volume of his 
"History of English Literature") : Ireland has pre- 
served for us the most ancient monuments of Celtic 
thought. . . . Important works in our day have thrown 
light on this literature, but all is not yet accomplished; 
and it is computed that the entire publication of the 
ancient Irish manuscripts would fill about a thousand 
octavo volumes. 

Stopford Brooke, (while Jusserand is turning to a 
further page of his learning reads from his ozvn notes) : 
And when we get these Irish literary remains done into 
English, they will start the Idylls of the King going for 
another thousand years. 

_ Jusserand (delighted at Brooke's enthusiasm of appre- 
ciation, and pointing to another paragraph in his "His- 
tory," reads impressively) : 

An inexhaustible fertility of invention was displayed 
by the Celtic makers of literature. They created the 
cycle of Conchobar, and afterwards that of Oisin, to 
which Macpherson's "adaptations" gave such world-wide 
renown that in our own century they directed Lamar- 
tine's early steps towards the realms of poetry. Later 
still they created the cycle of Arthur, most brilliant and 



the page, Jusserand glances towards the group about 
the Murphy dining room. He does not know that an 
elderly woman there is an .ardent patron of Mary Ander- 
son, and another a relative of the Sadlier novelist; and 
that two of the attentive men are, one Jerry Cohan, the 
father of George, and the other an inspiring guide of 
Victor Herbert. Bowing towards Stopford Brooke, to 
approve of his note, Jusserand continues from his 
volume) : 

No wonder if the descendants of these indefatigable 
inventors are men of rich literatures ; not meagre litera- 
tures, but deep and inexhaustible ones. And if a copious 
mixture of Celtic blood flows, though in different pro- 
portions, in the veins of the French and of the English, 
it will be no wonder if they happen some day to produce 
the greater number of the plays that are acted, and of 
the novels that are read, all over the civilized world. 

Brooke (with his finger among pages of his "Eng- 
lish Literature before the Norman Conquest," seems 
ready to read: he deems the pages too copious for the 
present moment) : 

What I say here has to do with the influences, direct 
and indirect, of the Gaels in the making of English lit- 
erature. 

G. K. C. (who had sat in his boyhood as a student 
at the feet of Stopford Brooke, is heard in the dis- 
tance, as if over a future horizon, singing of Colan of 
C aerie on) : 

Last of a race in ruin — 

He spoke the speech of the Gaels ; 

His kin were in holy Ireland, 

Or up in the crags of Wales. 

He kept the Roman order ; 

He made the Christian sign ; 

He made the sign of the Cross of God, 

He knew the Roman prayer: 

But he had unreason in his heart 

Because of the gods that were. 

For the great Gaels of Ireland 

Are the men that God made mad, 

For all their wars are merry 

And all their songs are sad. 

A nd as the assembled guests rose to give their good- 
*"*■ night salutation to Mistress Murphy and Miss 
Margaret, after another of the wholesome evenings at 
Home, the organ in the parlor was approving the classic 
truth of poetry, — 

Be it ever so humble 
There is no place like Home : 

and giving assurances to future poets to say (as Joyce 
Kilmer was to say), 

And the only reason a road is good, as every traveler 

knows, 
Is just because of the homes, the homes, the homes to 

which it goes. 

And then in the lamplight and merry laughter, the 
entire chorus resounded, 

You are welcome every evening 
In Maggie Murphy's Home; 



Hie the elders on the back porch confirmed the lines 
he Murphy poet, as if he had written in the reflective 
ler of a Greek choral odist. 

O blessed leisure hours, 
The working people know. 

i nd «t passant let us add that years afterward a scion 
* * of the Murphy household, a police lieutenant in the 
Bronx, engaged as a Welfare Worker with one of the 
splendid American Units during the Great War- and 
his training in the boyhood school of his grandmother's 
hospitality was influential in having that Unit proclaim 
at all of its "huts" in all of the camps, the honest 
slogan: Everybody welcome: everything free." 



Farewell, therefore, to Maggie Murphy's Home, a 
long farewell to all its greatness, unless a good Maecenas, 
such as Mr. Ford achieved for the Wayside Inn, will 
rescue the Home, and the principle of Home, from the 
cheerless spirit of Apartment and from the homelessness 
of Radio Stalls and Movie Theatres and Fireless Foyers 
Surely it would be the desire of the distinguished, home- 
loving director of the huge Empire State Building to see 
Maggie Murphy's Home lifted up and set as a shrine 
of principles in the empyrean of the loftiest tower — 
the Home that can say more truly than any king 'or 
congress, "Uetat, c'est mot," and hold aloft the heart of 
its song, "Home! Home, sweet home," to purify and 
strengthen the hearts of all the world. 






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RICHARD H. DANA 
DIES IN NEW YORK 

as Oldest Grandson of Henry 
W. Longfellow 
vlev«M4. iw7 Air 7^*3 

Richard Henry Dana, the oldest 
grandson of Henry Wadsworth Long- 
feliow and a member of one of the most 
'prominent families in New England, 
died at his home, 340 East Seventy- 
second street, New York, of pneumonia 
at noon yesterday. He was 54 years old. 
He was the fourth to bear the name 
of Richard Henry Dana and was a 
direct descendent of John Alden. His 
father was a well known civil service 
reformer, the author of books on civil 
service, and his mother was Edith Long- 
fellow, daughter of the poet. His grand- 
father of the same name was the author 
of "Two Years Before the Mast." His 
great grandfather, the first Richard 
Henry Dana, was also an author. All 
four were Harvard graduates. 

Mr. Dana was a professor of architec- 
ture at Yale, the author of a book on 
architecture, and the designer of sev- 
eral outstanding buildings. 

Mr. Dana wa.s born in the Longfel- 
low home at 105 Brattle street, Cam- 
bridge, Sept. 1, 1879. He was the only 
grandson of Longfellow born in his 
home. 

He studied at Browne and Nichols 
School, Cambridge, was graduated from 
Harvard in 1901; received the degree of 
S. B. at Columbia University and B. F. 
A. at Yale, and studied in the Beaux 
Arts in Paris. 

He established an architectural busi- 
ness in New York and also was profes- 
sor of architecture at Yale. He designed 
the Yale School in China and the Loom- 
is Boy's school in Connecticut. He had 
traveled extensively. 

In 1911 he married Ethel Nathalie 
Smith of New York in Grace Church, 
New York. 

He was a member of the Century 
Club, of New York, and the Harvard 
Club. 

Besides his widow he leaves his son, 
Richard Henry Dana, Jr., a senior at 
Harvard; and a daughter. Miss Mary 
Pep^rell Dana of New York; three 
brothers, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 
Dana of Cambridge, Allston Dana of 
New York, designer of the Washington 
bridge connecting New York and New 
Jersey, and Edmund Trowbridge Dana 



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The Wayside Inn of storied fame is the subject of this pleasing print in a series of block prints of old 
New England buildings of historic interest by Florence Bradshaw Brown of Provincetown. (All prints 



copyrighted by Mrs. Brown and reproduced by courtesy of Holman's Print Shop.) 






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mbridge, home of New England's beloved poet, Longfellow, whose gentle spirit 
seems to pervade even this block print in black a^l white, so svmpath^v^Uy docs Mrs. Brown pi 
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